5 European Sustainable Food Startups to Watch

5 European Sustainable Food Startups to Watch

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5 European sustainable food startup
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Food security and sustainability is an ever-more pressing problem as consumers demand sustainable options to help combat climate change. Fortunately, innovative companies are rising to the challenge. Here are 5 European sustainable food startups that are helping to invent the future of food. 
Napiferyn
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Poland-based Napiferyn is a recipient of funding from the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) Food division. The company takes the wastes from rapeseed oil production and processes them, extracting protein from the waste plant material left over after the oil is extracted. 
The sustainability angle:
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From a sustainability perspective, there’s a lot to celebrate about Napiferyn. Their vegetable protein product has the same nutritional value as soy. It could also be applied to other oil-bearing plants, such as sunflowers and yes, soybeans. 
As co-founded Magdalena Kozłowska explains: 
“Our technology to extract protein from rapeseed has the potential to transform the protein market by reducing food insecurity and increasing plant-based eating habits of consumers around the world.” 
NOQUO
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More and more people are turning to a plant-based diet, and that means that a growing segment of consumers are in search of plant-based alternatives to dairy products. While there are numerous options for plant-based milks, finding plant-based substitute cheese is often much trickier.
This is where Sweden-based Noquo comes in. The company is working on a plant-based alternative to cheese. 
The sustainability angle:
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Noquo is trying to do more than create another plant-based cheese: they want to create one that a) has minimal environmental impact, and 2) actually tastes good.
Founders Anja Leissner and Sorosh Tavakoli are making their cheese out of legumes, and they are choosing this food source for sustainability and taste alike. Their product is still in development, but they are hoping to create something that is sliceable, melt-able, and tastes like cheese, without the massive sustainability costs of conventional dairy.
KARMA
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Karma is an app created by a Sweden-based team who wanted to help reduce retail food waste. It allows food retailers to sell leftover food to consumers at half price. 
The sustainability angle:
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To draw on Karma’s own website, “If food waste was a country, it would be the 3rd biggest CO2 emission contributing country in the world.” 
Cutting back on food waste means the existing food supply better satisfies consumer need, and that means less wasted food and wasted carbon emissions. Karma has expanded from Sweden to countries such as the UK and France, and has even drawn praise from former U.S. President Barack Obama. 
ANTOFÉNOL
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France-based Antofénol is another EIT Food funding project. The company is seeking to help keep fruits and vegetables fresh by creating a sustainable alternative to the preservatives currently used. 
The sustainability angle:
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Antofénol takes agricultural waste from vineyards and transforms it into a preservative for fruits and vegetables. Their preservative is free of toxic industrial chemicals. 
As founder Fanny Rolet explains, the benefit is two-fold: “we replace molecules which could be harmful for the environment and health, whilst also recycling waste by transforming it into a product that can be used by the agricultural sector.”
HEURA
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Barcelona-based Heura is creating a soy-based protein meat substitute. If that sounds unoriginal, consider that blind testers have been unable to tell the difference with the real thing.
The sustainability angle:
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Heura’s soy-based meat substitute uses soybeans, which are much more sustainable than animal agriculture. It is also low in saturated fats, has no cholesterol, and has twice as much protein as an egg. It resembles and tastes like meat. 
Put it all together, and you have a tasty and nutritious meat substitute that’s far better for the planet than real meat. 

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