Can Hotels Save New York’s Flower District?

Can Hotels Save New York’s Flower District?

It would be all too easy to dismiss this remaining block as an anachronism, but ironically, the very forces of gentrification that reduced the flower district to its present condition may now be saving it.
New York’s flower district has a long and rich history | https://journalhotels.com/thejournalist/7152/the-locals-guide-to-nycs-flower-district/ | that stretches back for more than a century. Originally inhabiting East 34th Street, it moved to its current location on 28th Street in the 1890s.
The flower district thrived on 28th Street, growing to accommodate more than 60 vendors. By the late 1970s, the market had reached its apogee, and was eclipsed only by Amsterdam’s flower market in terms of the sheer number of flowers bought and sold on a daily basis.  
It was gentrification-related changes that resulted in the diminution of the flower district: as rents rose in the surrounding neighborhood of Chelsea and the industry itself changed in a variety of ways, the vast jungle garden of flowers receded from most of its once-mighty domain.
Now, however, several hotels have opened in the remaining district – and they are using this as a marketing technique to lure visitors. 
A good example is the Moxy Chelsea. The hotel has covered itself in flowers, and the lobby has a retail shop for floral design company Putnam & Putnam. The second floor has vertical gardens.
Read more on The Groh | https://www.thegroh.com/blog/can-hotels-save-new-york-s-flower-district-105/105 |

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