Overview of Aquaculture Certifications

Overview of Aquaculture Certifications

The worldwide demand for seafood has put tremendous pressure on fisheries, making aquaculture – farmed fish and other seafood – ever more important in the effort to secure environmentally sustainable food from the sea. 
However, not all aquaculture is equally sustainable. It is important for the discerning sustainable procurement officer to look for the right standards to ensure that they are truly obtaining sustainably-produced seafood. 
1) GLOBALG.A.P.
GLOBALG.A.P. is a major standard promoted by retailers. This standard has a global reach: it covers over 700 certified products | https://www.globalgap.org/uk_en/what-we-do/ | and over 200,000 producers in over 135 countries. The performance of its certification bodies is monitored by independent assessments, and it boasts the status of being the most widely accepted private sector food safety certification in the world. 
2) Global Aquaculture Alliance & Aquaculture Certification Council 
The Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) | https://www.aquaculturealliance.org/ | is an international non-governmental organization that has developed the Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) certification standards | https://bapcertification.org/ |. The organization engages in advocacy, as well as educating stakeholders in responsible aquaculture. 
GAA provides resources to individuals and to businesses around the world for the purpose of promoting sustainability in aquaculture. 
3) SalmonChile
Atlantic and Pacific salmon and trout represent some highly desirable fish stocks, and they are the focus of SalmonChile | https://www.salmonchile.cl/en/home/ |, an organization that brings together 47 different participants from both national and multinational companies.  
The southern parts of Chile are the center of some prime aquaculture production of salmon, and today Chilean salmon are present in 100 different national markets. 
4) Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation (SSPO) 
The Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation (SSPO) | http://scottishsalmon.co.uk/ | plays a central role in Scotland’s internationally important salmon aquaculture industry. Farmed salmon account for 40% of the value of all Scottish food exports, making the SSPO an organization with significance internationally as well as within the UK. 
5) International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM)
Originally founded in 1972, the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM) | https://www.ifoam.bio/en | has been the global organic umbrella organization since that time. For IFOAM, the early pioneers of the movement were ‘Organic 1.0’, and the organization now presides over Organic 2.0. 
Today IFOAM represents over 750 members in more than 127 countries, and bills itself as the voice of the global organic movement. IFOAM works toward sustainability in agriculture from the field to the customer, and is currently working to bring about Organic 3.0. 
6) Naturland 
Naturland | https://www.naturland.de/en/naturland/who-we-are.html | is one of the major international associations for organic agriculture, representing 65,000 farmers, beekeepers, fish farmers, and fishers in 58 different countries worldwide. 
Naturland has a special emphasis on ensuring that the interests of local producers are respected and reconciled with those of international operations.   
Since the middle of the 1990s, the Naturland Aquaculture and Sustainable Fishery program has been working to assure sustainability in a variety of aquaculture programs in 18 different countries in Europe, Latin America, and Southeast Asia. 
Conclusion 
Aquaculture can provide sources of seafood that do not pose a threat to wild stocks of fish and other marine life, but the manner in which they are farmed may still be more or less sustainable. The standards profiled here will help the discerning procurement officer to find ecologically responsible seafood.

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