The Changing Face of Flowers

The Changing Face of Flowers

The floral industry is changing, and it’s all thanks to a plucky new breed of florists and their back-to-the-land “slow flower” philosophy. 
Beginning in the 1990s, the floral industry entered a period of generic, predictable flower arrangements, primarily consisting of imported roses, lilies, fressia, and carnations.  
This pattern was no accident: when the U.S. removed an import duty on Colombian flowers, flower importers flooded the market with cheap South American flowers. As a consequence, half of American flower farms disappeared. 
Colombian imports now account for up to 80% of all the flowers sold in the United States, and they consist of the staple flowers that are hardy enough to survive the journey. 
But a growing number of plucky farmer-florists have rebelled against the dominance of imported generic flowers, and they are changing the flower industry in ways that are likely to become considerably more popular going forward. 
Instead of the same handful of imported staples, these farmer-florists are turning to locally-grown, so-called slow flowers | https://www.wyso.org/post/slow-flower-movement-changing-floral-industry | for new arrangements and styles. 
For Cincinnati-based florists That Girl’s Flowers, owned by Nellie Ashmore, this means rejecting imported South American flowers for locally-grown celosia, zinnias, dahlias, and foliage – ninebark, autumn olive, and viburnum, for example. 
The entire governing philosophy of the Slow Flower movement is an embrace of ecologically-friendly, locally-grown, sustainable back-to-the-land flower farming practices. 
Read more on The Groh | https://www.thegroh.com/blog/the-changing-face-of-flowers-106/106 |

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