The Evolution of New York City’s Flower District

The Evolution of New York City’s Flower District

But that was before decades of gentrification shrunk it to a single city block on West 28th Street – and before the age of the “selfie” and the rise of luxury hotels in the area turned it into a tourist attraction. 
The evolution of New York’s Flower District is a fascinating study in the changes that have occurred in the flower industry itself: the downfall of so much of the American flower market with the advent of cheap mass-imported flowers from Colombia, followed by a renaissance in the age of social media.
Although the market itself is much smaller, it is still an entire city block with sidewalks full of flowers. This has made it an Instagram-worthy destination for tourists and locals alike. 
More and more, people are coming to the flower district in order to take pictures and post them to social media. 
Much of what is driving the change is the rise of new luxury hotels taking advantage of the tourist draw of a block lined with flowers. 
Still, many locals or former residents can recall how the market was in the 1970s: a colorful and sometimes dangerous place.  
Their accounts combine seamy details – the experience of seeing their first prison camp tattoos, or seeing shopkeepers chase thieves twice their size – with a sense that the people who sold flowers there were fulfilling the American Dream of success through can-do-it-ness and overcoming hardship.
Read more on The Groh | https://www.thegroh.com/blog/the-evolution-of-new-york-city-s-flower-district-104/104 |

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