Weather and Climate

Sustainability is not just about recycling and the environment. Sustainability is the fundamental question of how to equitably improve the human condition in present and future generations while maintaining the environmental systems necessary to support a healthy and vibrant society. Is to answer. This is a working definition of sustainability from Dickinson. Like most definitions, our definition stems from concerns about the future of the Earth, its people, and their living systems. These are threatened by the growing human footprint which rapidly consumes and degrades environmental resources. Currently, the basic needs of large numbers of people are not being met and we recognize that poverty and inequality increase vulnerability to the environment and other dangers. It is motivated by values ​​that seek a balance between economic development, the eradication of poverty and hunger, the advancement of social justice and the protection of the natural world.

What is the definition of Sustainability ?

We hear the words “sustainable” and “sustainability” almost every day. But what does this mean exactly? Is it about people and culture, our environment or jobs and money? Is it the cities or the country? Is it for you and me or do other people need to be worried? Sustainability is about all of these things and more.

Durability can be defined as the ability or ability of something to be maintained or to be maintained. It's about taking what we need to live now, without compromising the potential of people in the future to meet their needs.

The term sustainability has become popular in policy-oriented research as an expression of this public policies must succeed. The main inspiration came from the Brundtland report from 1987. Since then, the concept has changed meaning. This article argues that change is regrettable in that it masks the real contradiction between long-term sustainability and short-term well-being. In addition, the distinction between three “pillars” of sustainability is conceptually blurry. We propose a definition which returns to the original sense in which the concept was intended. However, this article does not claim to offer a comprehensive view of the problem of durability. It presents a critical view of how the term is used in political debate and in the impact evaluation – the set of methods used in applied research to evaluate policies and projects.

The History of the Sustainability

The concept of sustainability was originally coined in forestry, where it means never harvesting
more than what the forest yields in new growth. The word Nachhaltigkeit (the German term for
sustainability) was first used with this meaning in 1713. The concern with preserving natural
resources for the future is perennial, of course: undoubtedly our Palaeolithic ancestors worried about
their prey becoming extinct, and early farmers must have been apprehensive about maintaining soil
fertility. Traditional beliefs enjoined thinking in terms of stewardship and concern for future
generations, as expressed in the oft-quoted words of a Nigerian tribal chief who saw the community as
“many dead, few living and countless others unborn”. Perhaps there have always
been two opposing views of the relation between humankind and nature: one which stresses adaptation
and harmony, and another which sees nature as something to be conquered. While this latter view may
have been rather dominant in Western civilization at least in recent centuries, its counterpoint has
never been absent.
Sustainability (without necessarily using the word) is a natural topic of study for economists: after
all, the scarcity of resources is of central concern to the dismal science. A famous example is the work
of Thomas Malthus, who published his theory about looming mass starvation (due to the inability of
available agricultural land to feed an expanding population) in 1798. A theory on the optimal rate of
exploitation of non-renewable resource which is still relevant today was formulated by Harold
Hotelling, an American economist, in 1931 . We shall have more to say about his views later.
A milestone in capturing the attention of global public policy was the report of the Club of
Rome, which predicted that many natural resources crucial to our survival would be exhausted
within one or two generations. Such pessimism is unbecoming in public policy which is, after all,
supposed to be about improving things. Therefore, the report of the UN World Commission on
Environment and Development, better known as the Brundtland Report after its chairperson, was
welcomed for showing a way out of impending doom. It was this report which adopted the concept of
sustainability and gave it the widespread recognition it enjoys today.

The question which Brundtland and her colleagues posed themselves was: how can the aspirations
of the world’s nations for a better life be reconciled with limited natural resources and the dangers of
environmental degradation? Their answer is sustainable development, in the Commission’s words:
development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future
generations to meet their own needs.
Thus, environmental concerns are important, but the basic argument is one of welfare, seen in a
context of inter-generational equity. We should care for the environment not because of its intrinsic
value, but in order to preserve resources for our children.
Since that time, there have been two major developments in the concept of sustainability: one, its
interpretation in terms of three dimensions, which must be in harmony: social, economic and
environmental. Two, the distinction between ‘strong’ and ‘weak’ sustainability. These two
developments are discussed critically in the Sections 3–4 and 5–6, respectively

The question Brundtland and his colleagues asked themselves was: how do aspirations nations of the world for a better life to come to terms with limited natural resources and the dangers environmental degradation? Their answer is sustainable development, in the words of the Commission: development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the capacity of the future generations to meet their own needs. Thus, environmental concerns are important, but the basic argument is that of well-being, seen in a context of intergenerational equity. We must take care of the environment and not because of its value, but in order to preserve resources for our children. Since then there have been two major developments in the concept of sustainability: one, its interpretation in terms of three dimensions, which must be in harmony: social, economic and environmental. Second, the distinction between “strong” and “weak” sustainability.

What future for Sustainability ?

Sustainability may then be defined as maintaining well-being over a long, perhaps even an indefinite
period. This covers largely the environmental dimension of the triple bottom line, but environment and
sustainability are not synonymous. On the one hand, some forms of environmental degradation are both
relatively easily reversed and highly noxious in the present—many forms of air and water pollution, for
instance. These have a strong well-being aspect. Indeed, in the EU Guidelines for Impact Assessment they appear both under the environmental and the social dimension. On the other hand, what we
bequeath to future generations also includes cultural heritage: art and cultural landscapes as well as
infrastructure, technology and institutions.

What future for Sustainability ?

La durabilité peut alors être définie comme le maintien du bien-être sur une longue période, voire indéfinie. période. Cela couvre en grande partie la dimension environnementale du triple résultat, mais l’environnement et la durabilité ne sont pas synonymes. D’une part, certaines formes de dégradation de l’environnement sont à la fois relativement facilement inversé et très nocif dans le présent – de nombreuses formes de pollution de l’air et de l’eau, pour exemple.

What is the History of the Sustainability

The concept of sustainability was originally coined in forestry, where it means never harvesting
more than what the forest yields in new growth. The word Nachhaltigkeit (the German term for
sustainability) was first used with this meaning in 1713.

What is the definition of Sustainability ?

Durability can be defined as the ability or ability of something to be maintained or to be maintained. It’s about taking what we need to live now, without compromising the potential of people in the future to meet their needs.

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